Apple Core! Baltimore!

Apparently there has been a phrase popular enough in the 1950’s as to appear both on a Donald Duck cartoon and an episode of the Andy Griffith show. The exchanged occured when someone had just finished or mostly finished eating an uncut apple and had need to dispense the core in some manner:

Eater: “Apple core!”
Friend1: “Baltimore!”
Eater: “Who’s your friend?”
Friend1: “Him!” and points to Friend2
Eater: Throws apple core at Friend2

I could easily see how fun it would be as the first to shout Baltimore might grant one the liberty of saying who must be assaulted by mostly-consumed fruit, and even purely at random selection. I would also find it perfectly acceptable to be the target, if I had known the rhyme ahead of time.

The first place I ever heard it was only recently, on the radio program A Way With Words on their March 7, 2009 episode, when a caller phoned in curious of its origin.

It’s been dated as far back as perhaps the 1920s according to this page. A letter was written in the early 1990s of a gentleman recalling some 60 years prior that it had been a common practice in his elementary school days to recite the exchange, putting an approximation of its usage to perhaps the 1920s or 30s depending his age of schooling at the time, as elementary spans over 10 years.

The same page also retracts a remark that the animator for a 1952 Donald Duck cartoon (streamed below) had invented the rhyme for the cartoon after discovering it was used in an illustration of a squaredance call from a book “Melody Time” from 1948.

cartoon on full screen

ChipandDaleOnline.com has a small remark about the above cartoon here and the particular exchange.

Update: Sept 7, 2015. A reader writes that her father, born 1909 in SE Oklahoma, corrected her when she came home from school repeating this phrase, that the real phrase was “Bite No More” not “Baltimore,” which I can find a few references to in school rhyme books, but nothing that far back.

“Apple core, bite no more. Point him out, hit him in the snout.”

This whole rhyme appears in at least 2 publications I can find, but they’re not older than 1980. The “rhyme” of this version is rather similar to the “rules” of the game, so there seems to be a connection. If any one has other similar stories from that far back, please do write in or comment below =)

Flash Game: GlueFO 2.0

I never played the 1.0 version, but here’s 2.0 and it’s pretty good. You’re a little spaceship piloted by the mouse, you go around collecting small orbs that stick to your shields, and press the mouse button to expel them so they will collide into larger orbs (a la Asteroids). Once you turn all of the largers into tinies, the level is over. There’s a ton of achievements to unlock, eight challenges that are really rather hard. Here’s my high score completing normal mode:

GlueFO 2.0

Weekly Post Feature Discontinued For Not Being Sufficiently Random

I’m discontinuing the weekly feature posts (a) because I was having trouble keeping up with them, and (b) my hit count plummeted by like 500 hits while I was doing it =P and (c) per the (usual? hmm) randomness of the site, they’ll just appear — randomly. I’ll put some up whenever, instead of scrounging for something and posting something because of a rule. Enjoy ^_^

Unaffected Items:
Random Images

Affected Items:
Mon/Tues/Wed/etc ___ of the Day

Fallout 3 Pitt DLC: Pitt Corrupted Textures + Video

This morning, I downloaded The Pitt, an add-on for the x360’s version of Fallout 3 and encountered a bunch of peculiar exclaimation points floating in random places. I was well expecting some sort of general screwup with Bethesda’s addons, with as how lame the Anchorage add-on was — but I wasn’t expecting a goof this overt. I got only a few seconds of it on video, although there were other texture issues, too.

In some places the ground texture would be missing, and you could walk under fences suspended in the air. In other areas, there were giant lines and columns of the red-diamond with a white exclaimation point, like it were some kind of giant icon for “texture missing” instead of just being clear. In other places even still, portions of structures’ textures looked normal from one angle, but then looked corrupted from another angle, as if it were paused mid-crumble when you got close to it. Some buildings you could see completely through.

The ultimate disappointment was when I tried to leave “The Mill” and the entire machine (green X functionality and all) came to a full halt during the loading timer. Fortunately I make tons of saves and doublesaves, so I had places to load back from without wasting hours, but every time I tried to exit The Mill no matter what I’d accomplished inside, it would always crash there.

I finally just gave up. As if taking all of my stuff from me at the beginning and starting out with zero inventory wasn’t bad enough. The Guitar Hero Metallica demo had finished downloading by then, so I just played that instead (not bad, tho only 2 of 4 demo songs are even Metallica).

I very stupidly deleted my download before I realized that I’d had in my hands a now-rare corrupted version of the add-on, but I *was* able to get some video from it, but just a little, showing the exclaimation points briefly. I was hoping to just redownload it incase I’d just had a poor connection problem, but turns out the DLC was removed from even being available.

Bethesda Softworks’ official blog post acknowledges the problem and that they’re working on getting Microsoft a new copy of the English version (don’t even think about it, I already tried chaning my system’s language to French and downloading perhaps a “French version” but no luck there) so Microsoft can put it back up ASAP. I’d stay tuned to Bethesda’s blog for quicker updates on the predicament. It appears to only affect the x360 version in English, and not the PC version. GameFAQs is naturally abuzz with people asking the same question over and over. Someone there managed to find a link to the 360 marketplace online, here.

YouTube Fullscreen Without Monitor Crash

Whenever I make any embedded video fullscreen, the feed will play for a few seconds but will shortly crash my monitor somehow (it will come out of fullscreen with a monitor-menu error, or perhaps a video card error) saying to the effect that I shouldn’t do that. However, an easier way is to just load the video feed directly into the browser itself, and not through a page:

1. In the address bar of the actual YouTube page, highlight everything including and after the first ampersand (the &) and delete.

2. Highlight watch?v= and delete.

3. Type v/ into that space, and hit enter.

4. Watch the video full screen.